F O R M A | Review - Architecture on Stage: Norman Foster
Are cities going to exacerbate our social and environmental problems or could they provide long-term solutions to them? On Tuesday 17 April 2018 Norman Foster shared with the audience of the Barbican his views on the future of architecture and urbanism.
Norman Foster, architecture, lecture, barbican, london, City, transport, talk, planning, urban design
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Review – Architecture on Stage: Norman Foster

Review – Architecture on Stage: Norman Foster

Are cities going to exacerbate our social and environmental problems or could they provide long-term solutions to them? On Tuesday 17 April 2018 Norman Foster shared with the audience of the Barbican his views on the future of architecture and urbanism.

By 2050, it is predicted that 70 percent of the world’s population will be urban. Cities are a fusion of buildings and infrastructure. In an industrialised society, buildings and the movement of goods and people between them account for two-thirds of energy consumption. As a result, cities contribute to around 70 percent of global CO2 emissions.

We are witnessing a mobility revolution that will profoundly change the form of settlements

Norman Foster introduced the challenges of urbanisation and sustainability, looking at how a new philosophy of ‘doing more with less’ can help generate effective design solutions.

If well designed and well governed, cities can improve the lives of billions of people who will be urban by 2050, by adopting bold solution to address critical problems through good leadership, strong and durable design and focused investment.

The 60% of space consumed in the cities by cars and transport infrastructure will be ready for better uses

He then showed some futuristic glimpses of the city, where meadows and trees invade the streets and squares and where the famous red double-deckers will fly …

Mr Foster was greeted by a crowded theater. 900 people adoring the archi-star but only one brave member of the public dared to ask him a question. “When will we go to Mars?” he asked. “In 10 years!” was the firm answer of the architect. And if Sir Norman Foster says so, get ready to go!

Simona Basili

High-density cities will survive because of accessibility

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